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EXCURSIONS

WHALE WATCHING MIRISSA

Mirissa sri lanka is popular tourist destination & now it has become a whale watching paradise. many whales types and hundreds of dolphins are spotted few nautical miles away from harbour through out the year.each morning by 7am boats are departed as scheduled.

DOPLPHIN WATCHING KALPITIYA

"Everyone said that I would spot hundreds of dolphins out there. I didn't really believe until I was out there. They were right, there's hundreds!"

Enjoy a dolphin trip from November to March. You wont regret it!

We also offer private boat trips to the beautiful islands in the region and the famous bar reef.

TURTLE HATCHERY

Maintaining a turtle hatchery is very expensive.A large amount of money has to be spent on the construction and repair of tanks, pumping sea water, cleaning and purchasing fish for feeding. We depend entirely on the entrance fees charged from tourists and during the off-seasons we find it extremely difficult to maintain the centre. We need support for the developments.

Sea Turtles are born under ground (under sand to be more accurate). Then they find their way to the surface, and to the ocean, after which they start a life filled with many dangers, where only a few will make it through the growing years. Releasing baby turtles is a very unique experience. And there is nothing like holding a baby turtle in your hand.

GLASS BOTTOM BOAT RIDES

The beach of Hikkaduwa in Sri Lanka is situated 98 km from Colombo towards the south of Sri Lanka. This fun coastal town, 14 km away from Galle was the first (1960’s) of Sri Lanka’s beautiful beaches to be discovered by tourists. Snorkeling and diving in the clear waters are a major past-time along this stretch
and is the most environmentally friendly way to see the colorful fish that dart around.

The name Hikkaduwa is thought to have been derived from the two words Ship Kaduwa, with Ship being the shorter version of Shilpaya which refers to knowledge in Sinhalese and Kaduwa which means sword.

Off the beach there is a collection of small islets surrounded by beautiful coral formations. Many species of fish and large turtles are found here. There are more than four different shipwrecks for diving enthusiasts to explore along with dive shops offering PADI courses and equipment.

With plenty of beachfront accommodation and a reputation as the second best surf spot in Sri Lanka, the reason why so many visit Hikkaduwa is blatantly clear. The resort area has now engulfed two or three villages south of it, and is now a 4km strip of hotels, shops, bars, restaurants and guesthouses. The beaches are lovely and wide and swimming is safe here, though the currents are stronger when it comes to the south of Hikkaduwa.

The area is not overcrowded but there are many tourists and locals during the peak season. Since its a coral reef, it is always advisable for travelers to be safe than sorry. Do not feel intimidated by the locals although there might be instances that you feel hassled.

GALLE FORT

Galle Fort in the Bay of Galle on the southwest coast of Sri Lanka, was built first in 1588 by the Portuguese, then extensively fortified by the Dutch during the 17th century from 1649 onwards. It is a historical, archaeological and architectural heritage monument, which even after more than 423 years maintains a polished appearance, due to extensive reconstruction work done by Archaeological Department of Sri Lanka.

The fort has a colourful history, and today has a multi-ethnic and multi-religious population.The Sri Lankan government and many Dutch people who still own some of the properties inside the fort are looking at making this one of the modern wonders of the world.The heritage value of the fort has been recognized by the UNESCO and the site has been inscribed as a cultural heritage UNESCO World Heritage Site under criteria iv, for its unique exposition of "an urban ensemble which illustrates the interaction of European architecture and South Asian traditions from the 16th to the 19th centuries."

The Galle Fort, also known as the Dutch Fort or the "Ramparts of Galle", withstood the Boxing Day tsunami which damaged part of coastal area Galle town. It has been since restored.

LIGHTHOUSE DONDRA

Dondra Head Lighthouse is a lighthouse located on Dondra Head, Dondra, the southernmost point in Sri Lanka and is Sri Lanka's tallest lighthouse, and also one of the tallest in South East Asia. Dondra Head lighthouse is operated and maintained by the Sri Lanka Ports Authority.

The lighthouse is near the village of Dondra, and is approximately 6 km (3.7 mi) southeast of Matara. The name Dondra is a synonym for "Devi-Nuwara" in the local Sinhala language, "Devi" meaning "Gods" and "Nuwara" meaning "City". Dondra is therefore derived to mean "City of the Gods".

MADOLDUWA

Places like Koggala attract tourists to Sri Lanka from various countries. Koggala is located on the southern face of Sri Lanka. Koggala museum is the home of former famous writer Martin Wickramasinghe. Koggala town has a valuable culture, custom, and folks. Koggala is an ideal place for travelers’ aptitude of Sinhala culture and tradition. Koggala museum consists of wood, furniture, traditional masks and costumes of folk dancers. Visitors can enjoy the boat trips in the lagoon and Koggala lake to explore other tiny islands and the bio diversity around the Koggala site. Koggala is a perfect place for bird watching. Hundreds of birds are coming roost at evening.

MADU RIVER BOAT RIDES

Take a magical speed-boat ride down the beautiful Madu River, a wetland estuary spreading over 900 hectares of which 770 hectares is covered with water and inhabited with 64 islands. The boat ride is a wonderful way to take a closer look at this complex wetland ecosystem; a world heritage site protected by the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands being one of the last wetlands in Sri Lanka to contain a pristine mangrove forest.

Journey past massive mangrove forests, glide under the canopy of the forest tunnels as they curve playfully towards the watercourse. Take in the unique biodiversity of the Madu River and its surrounding islands that boasts of hundreds of birds, plants, fish and animals.

There’s plenty more to do; quench your thirst with a refreshing drink of King Coconut Water and then proceed towards the Buddhist Monastery, see how Kraal fishing is carried out, how Ceylon Cinnamon is peeled and enjoy some ‘fish therapy’ as they playfully nibble your feet at the ‘fish spa’. If it’s later in the evening watch the fishermen in their canoes lighting lanterns on traps that catch prawn and other shellfish. It’s certainly going to be a memorable day-out on the serene waters of the unforgettable Madu River!

HORTON PLAINS WORLDS END

Horton Plains National Park is a protected area in the central highlands of Sri Lanka and is covered by montane grassland and cloud forest. This plateau at an altitude of 2,100–2,300 metres (6,900–7,500 ft) is rich in biodiversity and many species found here are endemic to the region. This region was designated a national park in 1988. It is also a popular tourist destination and is situated 8 kilometres (5.0 mi) from Ohiya, 6 kilometres (3.7 mi) from the world famous Ohiya Gap/Dondra Watch and 32 kilometres (20 mi) from Nuwara Eliya.

The Horton Plains are the headwaters of three major Sri Lankan rivers, the Mahaweli, Kelani, and Walawe. In Sinhala the plains are known as Maha Eliya Plains. Stone tools dating back to Balangoda culture have been found here. The plains' vegetation is grasslands interspersed with montane forest and includes many endemic woody plants. Large herds of Sri Lankan sambar deer feature as typical mammals and the park is also an Important Bird Area with many species not only endemic to Sri Lanka but restricted to the Horton Plains. Forest dieback is one of the major threats to the park and some studies suggest that it is caused by a natural phenomenon.

The sheer precipice of World's End and Baker's Falls are among the tourist attractions of the park.

YALA SAFARI

Yala National Park is the most visited and second largest national park in Sri Lanka, bordering the Indian Ocean. The park consists of five blocks, two of which are now open to the public, and also adjoining parks. The blocks have individual names such as, Ruhuna National Park (Block 1), and Kumana National Park or 'Yala East' for the adjoining area. It is situated in the southeast region of the country, and lies in Southern Province and Uva Province. The park covers 979 square kilometres (378 sq mi) and is located about 300 kilometres (190 mi) from Colombo. Yala was designated as a wildlife sanctuary in 1900, and, along with Wilpattu was one of the first two national parks in Sri Lanka, having been designated in 1938. The park is best known for its variety of wild animals. It is important for the conservation of Sri Lankan elephants, Sri Lankan leopards and aquatic birds.

There are six national parks and three wildlife sanctuaries in the vicinity of Yala. Among the largest is Lunugamvehera National Park. The park is situated in the dry semi-arid climatic region and rain is received mainly during the northeast monsoon. Yala hosts a variety of ecosystems ranging from moist monsoon forests to freshwater and marine wetlands. It is one of the 70 Important Bird Areas (IBAs) in Sri Lanka. Yala harbours 215 bird species including six endemic species of Sri Lanka. The number of mammals that has been recorded from the park is 44, and it has one of the highest leopard densities in the world.

The area around Yala has hosted several ancient civilizations. Two important pilgrim sites, Sithulpahuwa and Magul Vihara, are situated within the park. The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami caused severe damage on the Yala National Park and 250 people died in its vicinity. The number of visitors has been on the rise since 2009, after the security situation in the park improved.

KANNELIYA SNAKE WATCHING

Kanneliya-Dediyagala-Nakiyadeniya, or KDN, is a forest reserve in the Southern Province of Sri Lanka. Identified as one of the most floristically rich areas in South Asia; this forest region is the last remaining large rainforest in Sri Lanka, other than the Sinharaja Rainforest. The forest is situated 35km northwest of the City of Galle; and is a major catchment area for two of the most important rivers in southern Sri Lanka, Gin Ganga and Nilwala Ganga. Designated as a biosphere reserve in 2004 by UNESCO, the Kanneliya forest reserve home to many endemic plant and animal species.

CITY TOUR IN DOUBLE DECKER BUS

The Colombo City Tour, the only open deck city sightseeing service in Sri Lanka is a venture by Sri Lanka Tourism & Ebert Silva Holidays. It offers unmatched experiences and exclusive glimpses into Sri Lanka's premier city of "Old & New"